What defines an adult?

I am writing this in light of those aged 22 to 25 years old—the seemingly confused young adults around me. I cannot help but be curious of the fact that certain young people in that age bracket easily fall into discouragement. Worries that success may be against them. A sense of helplessness that drives them out of the limelight. A time spent in idle waiting.

Children are often asked the undying question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Often they’d reply that they want to become a policeman, a chef, a teacher, a doctor, or any other professional that interests them. It comes with their knowing that adulthood is about work or social status. Along with it comes a picturesque satisfaction that when they become what they want they’d be living a good life—a life of joy in living one’s intended purpose. Worth.

“When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.” 1 Corinthians 13:11

Around the world, 50-year-old adults are having a hard time with living the life they want. Some, aged 40 years, are yet groping to establish a well-meaning career. Teenagers also venture through life claiming that they are already mature enough to make a life of their own. And, some of those living above 80 years have weakened in memory and strength—the “good life” they once knew now seemingly eludes them. What has become of them?

Well, sometimes the world can be hard on adults. Majority expects them to make rational decisions as well as to possess a thorough knowledge and understanding of almost everything that’s going on in their lives—their intellectual, physical, and social capabilities are said to already have developed. They aren’t expected to be perfect, but are already thought of as “mature” assets of society. Childish acts, such as whining, no longer attract them. And, entertainment is brought to an advanced level. LOL

Thinking about “adulthood” is at times amusing. Age has its bounds as it may come contrary to what the “adult” is showing through actions and words. And, claims to maturity can also negate from what’s evident. What remains constant is the wonderful opportunity of improving oneself. One may fail expectations through age and standards, but we still have the constant chance of improvement.

So, to all who are yet entering adulthood and are seemingly down, don’t isolate yourself. Empower yourself with all the good things and with all the good people around you. Don’t drown in expectations. Instead, love the beauty and firmness of character that life calls you to, but avoid the foolishness that it can tempt you to do or to even think about. Who knows? Adulthood can be just about being a year older.

Live. Love. Laugh. Carpe diem!

 

~OKaren

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